Create-Destroy-Develop

[Art and Design]

Old Dead and Bloody

Anamanaguchi - Meow

xylophony:

Day 26: Meow, Anamanaguchi

meow! meow meow meow meow! meow meow meow meow meow meow meow meow meow meow!

(via tapiocatea)

nevver:

Call me

likeafieldmouse:

Julie Mehretu - Mogomma: Part I (2012)

Additional shots found herehere & here.

escapekit:

Qian Hu Fish Farm

This project’s direction uses 1980s  ' cheesy '  nostalgic aquarium imagery and vibe to explore on Qian Hu’s rich history. These imageries have been given a modern reintepretation and twist , whilst keeping its nostalgia. Cyan, a conventional color for water, was used as the main corporate color to represent Qian Hu’s firm beliefs in tradition and straight-forwardness.

(Source: behance.net)

sayadaramdial:

WIP 

sayadaramdial:

WIP 

batlesbo:

8bitmonkey:

Rachel
KR0NPR1NZ 
Blog

Just came around to watching Blade Runner. Lovely old sci-fi (better than most recent sci fi I see nowadays), the protagonist was painfully daft and morally questionable but that’s one of the reason it made the film so unique: you actually want him to die and the “villains” to be happy.
Oh and Vangelis.

batlesbo:

8bitmonkey:

Rachel

KR0NPR1NZ

Blog

Just came around to watching Blade Runner. Lovely old sci-fi (better than most recent sci fi I see nowadays), the protagonist was painfully daft and morally questionable but that’s one of the reason it made the film so unique: you actually want him to die and the “villains” to be happy.

Oh and Vangelis.

viazi:

i rewatched what was missing today \:^)

viazi:

i rewatched what was missing today \:^)

(via xekstrin)

ursulavernon:

pulpcovers:

Haven’t You A Size Smaller? http://ift.tt/1eSAJvF

Most of the Pulp Covers are hysterically awful, but I actually find this one rather endearing.

ursulavernon:

pulpcovers:

Haven’t You A Size Smaller? http://ift.tt/1eSAJvF

Most of the Pulp Covers are hysterically awful, but I actually find this one rather endearing.

(via xekstrin)

A cross- dressing Katharine Hepburn from Sylvia Scarlett (1936) by Ernest A. Bachrach.

(Source: headmistressmcgonagall, via perfectnonfreedom)